Tag Archives: Strunk and White

On Knowing Ourselves

In 2012 posting called “Strunk and White” in this blog, I criticized a 2009 essay about the pair called “50 Years of Stupid Grammar Advice.” Strunk and White had not been trying to give grammar advice. They wrote not the elements of grammar, but The Elements of Style. They gave style advice by precept and example. The advice is good, if well understood; the critic should recognize that, as I wrote, “Rules of style are supposed to induce thinking, not obedience.”

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Learning mathematics

This is mostly reminiscences about high school. I also give some opinions about how mathematics ought to be learned. This article originally formed one piece with my last article, “Limits”.

I learned calculus, and the epsilon-delta definition of limit, in Washington D.C., in the last two years of high school, in a course taught by a peculiar fellow named Donald J. Brown. The first of these two years was officially called Precalculus Honors, but some time in that year, we started in on calculus proper. Continue reading

Strunk and White

The following is a lightly edited concatenation of some emails I wrote several years ago, in response to ‘50 Years of Stupid Grammar Advice,’ Geoffrey K. Pullum’s article in The Chronicle of Higher Education (April 17, 2009). Continue reading